Easter Cookie Cutters

From Wiki des DAI Makerspace
Jump to: navigation, search

There was an Easter themed workshop in the DAI Makerspace on Sunday, March 13th from 11:00 to 16:00 h.

We designed and made cookie cutters together, which is a great start into 3D printing without any prior experience. Participants only needed to bring a laptop (if possible) and a couple of ideas!

This workshop was especially well suited for children and there was an opportunity to test the newly printed cookie cutters right away:

the first results



Organizer(s)

Ciaran, Lukas, Mitja, Patrick

Location

DAI Makerspace

Date

2016-03-13

Time

11:00-15:00

(what's an "event"?)



Instructions[edit | edit source]

We start by drawing the outline of a cutter on Cookie Caster. This simple web tool turns any 2D path into a 3D cookie cutter with the desired dimensions and a rim to press it into the dough more easily. A path can be created by hand using the "pen" tool and the "add/delete points" (+ and -) buttons in the top right hand corner or by automatically tracing a picture of your choice. Using this so-called "magic trace" function can be very quick if used on a silhuette or clip-art image but will prevent you from changing single points or curves later on.


two steps in the freehand drawing of an egg - blue dots are corners, orange dots define curves


When the basic cutter is done, download the file with these settings (for stable, but sharp walls):

  • Max Size: Small (2-3")
  • Height: 0.65"
  • Thickness: Extra Thin (1 mm)


Now we could already print this file or add internal shapes using Tinkercad (? website). Our Tinkercad account name is maker.daihd@gmail.com along with the usual password. Please be aware that you are sharing this account with other Makers! You should always name your designs with your name and a meaningful summary, and restrain from deleting or altering anything besides your own work. If you are going to use Tinkercad regularly you will probably be better off with an account of your own.

after 4 hours, some rather detailed cookie molds were ready for testing